What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls: emerging evidence and innovative approaches

Stream: Examining What Works: what have been critical components in developing research-based responses that have also delivered promising results?
Date: Tuesday, 10 February 2015
Time: 4.10 pm – 5.40 pm

Abstract

The What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls Programme is a flagship programme from the UK Department for International Development (DFID), which is investing an unprecedented £25 million over five years to the prevention of violence against women and girls. It supports primary prevention efforts across Africa, Asia and the Middle East that seek to understand and address the underlying causes of violence to stop it from occurring. Dr Fulu will present on this programme and its recent global systematic reviews of what interventions are most promising and effective in stopping violence before it starts. She will discuss where the field is moving in terms of innovative approaches to prevent violence against women and girls. The presentation will also draw upon key findings from the UN Multi-country Study on Men and Violence with over 10,000 men in Asia-Pacific to show how addressing the underlying drivers of violence which relate to gender inequality, childhood trauma, harmful models of masculinity, among others is a critical component in developing effective strategies for the prevention of violence against women and girls.

Author

Emma Fulu (Presenter), Technical Lead, What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls, South African Medical Research Council
Emma Fulu has a PhD from the University of Melbourne and works at the South African Medical Research Council as the Lead on What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls. What Works is a UK-funded global programme investing an unprecedented £25 million over 5 years to the prevention of violence against women and girls. It supports primary prevention efforts across Africa, Asia and the Middle East, that seek to understand and address the underlying causes of violence to stop it before it starts. Previously Emma was the Research Coordinator at Partners for Prevention, a joint UN Programme and the Principal Investigator for the UN Multi-Country Study on Men and Violence. This study included research with more than 13,000 men and women across seven countries in Asia-Pacific exploring the connections between masculinities, gender, and power to enhance violence prevention interventions. Emma has led research on GBV in the Maldives, Solomon Islands and Kiribati and acted as an advisor to the UN and WHO on these issues. Emma is the author of the book Domestic Violence in Asia: Globalization, Gender and Islam in the Maldives, a number of journal articles and blogs for the Huffington Post on gender and violence.