Pre-conference events

Delegates who have registered for the full conference (2.5 days) were also eligible to attend a pre-conference master class (free of charge) during the morning of Tuesday, 10 February.
 
Master class sign-up closed on Tuesday, 3 February 2015 (midnight AEDT).

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Master Classes

SRVAW Asia-Pacific Consultation on Women's Rights Protections

Master Classes

Pre-conference master classes were held on Tuesday, 10 February 2015 from 9.30am - 12.30pm. These sessions were hands-on, original learning experiences aimed at sharing innovative ideas and their application in practice, and were led by internationally recognised academics and practitioners. 

There is no additional cost for the master classes, but only delegates who have paid to attend the full conference were eligible to attend. While we tried to meet demand by increasing venue capacity if needed, confirmation was on a first-come basis and sent by email on February 4.

Once full conference registration payment was completed, delegates could select their first and second choices from among the following master classes.

Master class sign-up closed on Tuesday, 3 February 2015 (at midnight AEDT).

See below for information about each of the master classes:

Gendered Violence and the Workplace - current approaches to preventing and responding to the effects of domestic/sexual violence on the workplace

Intervention and Prevention in the Digital Age - the intersection between the misuse of technology and gender-based violence

Male Peer Support for Violence against Women: Policy and Practice - where do we go from here?

Post-separation Violence - exploring the interface between domestic violence services and child protection in the family law and the ‘safe at home’ context

Specialist Domestic Violence and Sex Offences Courts – planning and implementation strategies for an innovative court model

UN Multi-country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific – why do some men use violence against women and how can we prevent it? 

Writing about and Documenting Trauma – ways to address loss, memory, commemoration and the desire for reparation in the context of gendered violence

Gendered Violence and the Workplace – current approaches to preventing and responding to the effects of domestic/sexual violence on the workplace

National surveys in four countries now confirm that domestic violence affects the attendance, performance and safety of employees in their workplace, risking job security and costing millions to the economy. Australia is a global leader in recognising domestic violence, and more recently sexual violence, as an issue which requires standardised and enforceable workplace protections. Over 1.6 million Australian workers are now covered by domestic violence clauses in their enterprise agreement or award conditions. This master class will share the outcomes and experiences of the pioneering ‘Safe at Home, Safe at Work’ Program; explore the process of introducing and implementing domestic violence clauses; and discuss the international developments occurring in this field.

Presenter:  Ludo McFerran, Adjunct Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, and Manager, ‘Safe at Home, Safe at Work’ Program, Gendered Violence Research Network, UNSW

Convenor: kylie valentine, Deputy Director and Senior Research Fellow, Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW


Intervention and Prevention in the Digital Age – the intersection between the misuse of technology and gender-based violence

Technology impacts survivors experiencing gender-based violence such as domestic and family violence, stalking, sexual violence, dating violence and abuse, and revenge porn. This master class will introduce ‘Safety Net Projects’ as a response to the increasing misuse of technology by abusers to locate, track, stalk, harass and commit other acts of violence against their victims. The session will cover a range of commonly misused technologies including mobile phones, SMS, voice mail, smart phone apps, social networking sites, GPS, spyware, hidden cameras, recording devices, hacking and more. It will also explore how survivors can use technology to improve or maintain their safety, and the safe and secure use of technologies by agencies assisting survivors. 

Presenter: Kaofeng Lee, Deputy Director, Safety Net Project, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), Julie Oberin, National Chair of WESNET (Women’s Services Network) and AWAVA (Australian Women Against Violence Alliance)

Convenor: Sanja Milivojevic, Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, UNSW


Male Peer Support for Violence against Women: Policy and Practice – where do we go from here? 

Male peer support refers to sociological and psychological processes by which patriarchal and/or violent peers influence men to behave in abusive and oppressive ways. In particular, this concept helps to explain how certain all-male groups encourage, justify and support violence against women by their members. The main objective of this session is to suggest a multi-pronged way of dealing with complex interrelationship between broader social forces, male peer support, and woman abuse in its many shapes and forms. This master class will devote special attention to the following issues: the contribution of new technologies; public protests; boycotting harmful companies, products, and services; transforming ‘well-meaning men’ into feminist responders; and the role of the home and school. 

White Ribbon Australia logo

Presenter: Walter DeKeseredy, Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences, Director of the Research Centre on Violence, and Professor of Sociology, West Virginia University.

Co-Convenor: Libby Davies, CEO, White Ribbon Australia 

Co-Convenor: Jessica Luter, Senior Executive, Programs, White Ribbon Australia

Sponsor: White Ribbon Australia


Post-separation Violence – exploring the interface between domestic violence services and child protection in the family law and the ‘safe at home’ context

Recent projects have highlighted the complexity of interventions and innovations which are needed to keep more women and their children ‘safe at home’. This master class will be a practice-based session to explore issues of post-separation violence in the context of ‘safe at home’ strategies and the development of appropriate child protection pathways following separation. It will include examining the interface for workers across the family and domestic violence intervention sector with child protection; addressing the issues for children in post-separation protection and the potential developments for innovative practice in this area; and identifying the strategies which strengthen ‘safe at home’ responses including with child protection and the family law processes.

Presenter: Cathy Humphreys, Professor, Department of Social Work, University of Melbourne

Convenor: Helen Pringle, Senior Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, UNSW


Specialist Domestic Violence and Sex Offences Courts – planning and implementation strategies for an innovative court model

Can the criminal justice system be ‘transformed’ to enhance its response to sex offense cases? What role can the court play in a community transformation? This master class will introduce a new model being implemented in the U.S. to promote justice by providing a comprehensive approach to case resolution, increasing sex offender accountability, enhancing community safety, and ensuring victim safety while protecting the rights of all litigants. Participants will learn about strategies to implement a sex offense court depending on specific jurisdictional needs; the challenges and lessons learned; and the crucial role of stakeholders in transforming the community’s response to a seamless system for monitoring and supervising offenders and enhancing services to victims.

Presenter: Rebecca Thomforde Hauser, Associate Director, Domestic Violence and Sex Offender Management Programs, Centre for Court Innovation.

Convenor: Annie Cossins, Associate Professor, Law and Co-Convener, Gendered Violence Research Network, UNSW


UN Multi-country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific – why do some men use violence against women and how can we prevent it? 

This major global study based on interviews with over 10,000 men in six countries produced the world’s first comprehensive cross-country comparable data about the commission of physical and sexual violence towards intimate partners and others, and factors associated with these offences. It has also generated a very large data set with possibilities for analysis in fields as diverse as violence, gender and masculinity, reproductive health, mental health, sexuality, and childhood adversity. This master class will examine the study’s design and key findings, including how disclosure of offending behaviour was facilitated; explore how researchers can access this dataset; and share opportunities for further analysis of the significant data set generated from the study.

Presenter: Emma Fulu, Technical Lead, What Works to Prevent Violence against Women and Girls, South African Medical Research Council.

Convenor: Jo Spangaro, Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, UNSW

Sponsor: School of Social Sciences, UNSW


Writing about and Documenting Trauma – ways to address loss, memory, commemoration and the desire for reparation in the context of gendered violence

The Living Memory Project filmed in Dili, Timor Leste during the post-occupation years features brave and moving testimony from torture survivors, both male and female. All still bear the mental scars, with some also suffering permanent physical injuries. This master class will begin with a viewing of video archival footage, followed by discussion on writing about and documenting trauma, and an exercise in which participants can explore writing about traumatic experiences themselves. Questions raised will include how victims are affected by their experience and how they deal with the consequences which linger today. Note: although the subject matter is potentially distressing, the presentation does not display gory or sensationalist material, and this session will be conducted in a supportive environment.

Presenter: Jill Jolliffe, award-winning journalist, author, film-maker and political activist

Convenor: Anne Brewster, Associate Professor, School of the Arts & Media, UNSW 


SRVAW Asia-Pacific Consultation on Women's Rights Protections

UN Special Rapporteur Rashida Manjoo

The UNSW School of Social Sciences and the Australian Human Rights Centre hosted a pre-conference consultation led by Rashida Manjoo, UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women, its Causes and Consequences (SRVAW) and Professor, Department of Public Law, University of Cape Town. This invitation-only session took the form of a structured dialogue with participants on the challenges of holding states to their obligations in reducing and preventing violence against women (VAW). The Special Rapporteur hoped to facilitate discussion with participants on how best to address the normative gap in international human rights law as regards VAW. Responses from this consultation may be included in the SRVAW’s 2015 report to the UN Human Rights Council. 

The consultation took place on 10 February 2015, 9:30am-12:30pm, followed by a light lunch. Participation was free of charge but limited to 50 delegates who paid the full conference registration fees and applied to attend via the Expression of Interest (EOI) process. The EOI deadline was on 28 November 2014 and this session is now full. Preference has been given to applicants who are actively engaged in women’s rights protections in the Asia-Pacific region as policy makers, advocates, activists, practitioners or researchers.